Marine information and plan

Enbridge is committed to ensuring that vessels transporting petroleum and condensate via the Northern Gateway Terminal in Kitimat will be operated to the highest internationally recognized safety and environmental standards. The safe passage of marine vessels will be achieved through a comprehensive strategy that brings together the best people, technology and planning. The marine strategy will include the following standards:

  • All vessels entering Kitimat Marine Terminal will be modern and double-hulled
  • Operational safety limits will be established to cover visibility, wind and sea conditions
  • The escort tugs will have extensive first response capabilities to provide immediate assistance if required (available to any ship in distress)
  • Northern Gateway will install an advanced radar system to cover important route sections to provide guidance to pilots and all marine traffic on the Northwest coast
  • Additional navigational aids will be installed, such as navigation beacons, buoys and lights throughout the confined channel area
  • Prior to arrival in Canadian waters, all vessels will be vetted by independent, third-party agencies and will be required to meet Northern Gateway's safety and environmental standards
  • Vessel speed will be reduced in the marine channels to between 8 and 12 knots
  • All tankers visiting the Kitimat Marine Terminal will be safely guided by certified marine pilots
  • While docked at the Northern Gateway Kitimat Marine Terminal, tankers loading export oil will be surrounded by a containment boom
  • Information from new weather stations along the route will be available to all vessels
  • Northern Gateway will significantly increase the emergency response capabilities along the main northern shipping routes, making the routes safer, not just for tankers but for everyone

Marine PDFs can be found here

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  • Northern Gateway, Mar 26th, 2013 (2 years ago)

    Hi Arthur, thanks for your questions.

    Regardless of liability, the response at the marine terminal would be immediate and independent of the assignment of liability. Protecting the environment is the Project’s top priority.

    Transcripts from the JRP hearings are available on the NEB website here: http://gatewaypanel.review-examen.gc.ca/clf-nsi/prtcptngprcss/hrng-eng.html

    The panel most likely to have discussed liability issues at the terminal sat from February 4 through February 26.

    Canada’s Marine Liability Act can be found on Transport Canada’s website here: http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/acts-regulations/acts-2001c6.htm

    There may be other laws/legislation that apply to the situation you’ve described.

  • Arthur Caldicott, Mar 24th, 2013 (2 years ago)

    In early March, John May said that "when the transfer from shore installation to ship is completed, hoses disconnected, and title passed to the buyer by signing by the vessel's Master or Agent on his behalf a Bill of Lading then liability for any spill also passes to the vessel and its owner."

    It sounds like he knows what he's talking about. Can Northern Gateway confirm that this is how and when liability is transferred from the terminal owner to the ship owner? Would you point me to where in evidence this process is described? Presumably that will also get me to the legislation and regulations that govern this matter.

    Thank-you.

  • Deep, Mar 23rd, 2013 (2 years ago)

    What type of Oil Spill containment system will be used? Where will it be based out of? For both Marine and Land?

  • Northern Gateway, Mar 07th, 2013 (2 years ago)

    Hi Anthony, thanks for your great question.

    Here's a link to the evidence we've submitted to the National Energy Board that answers your question in detail: https://www.neb-one.gc.ca/ll-eng/livelink.exe/fetch/2000/90464/90552/384192/620327/624798/833081/B83-17_-_Attachment_8_-_Recovery_of_the_Biophysical_and_Human_Environments_from_Oil_Spills_-_A2V1T1.pdf?nodeid=832993&vernum=0

    Although oil spills have adverse effects on biophysical and human environments, the scientific literature is clear that ecosystems and their components recover. The literature is also clear that although recovery can occur in some circumstances without clean-up, appropriate clean-up does enable and accelerate recovery.

    Our top priority is to prevent incidents from occurring. In the unlikely event of an incident, protection of sensitive environments and species is at the core of our emergency response plans. The project has committed to ongoing, extensive environmental studies to better understand the current ecosystems--including specie populations, changes and impacts etc, in order to establish the best environmental monitoring and protection plans practicable.

  • Anthony Ball, Mar 05th, 2013 (2 years ago)

    There is no doubt that your company wants to prevent any chances of spills, and also react to any situations as fast as possible. Based on the amount of research and information on your site, you have created protocols and resources for this type of situation. My question is not about the clean up procedure and fines levied by the government., but rather about the animals who live in and migrate through the area. In the unfortunate event that something does happen, and one or more species is severely impacted; do you have any protocols or strategies set up to help rejuvenate those species back, or close to, there original population levels?

    Anthony

  • john a may, Mar 02nd, 2013 (2 years ago)

    march 3rd 2013

    when the transfer from shore installation to ship is completed ,hoses disconnected, and title passed to the buyer by signing by the vessel's Master or Agent on his behalf a Bill of Lading then liability for any spill also passes to the vessel and its owner.
    What is the $ limit of liability provided by the owners P and I Club.
    Can the Province of British Columbia require its own liability limit while the vessel is within coastal water - or up to the time the ship reaches the Canadian territorial limit
    j may north vancouver

  • Northern Gateway, Feb 14th, 2013 (2 years ago)

    Hi Erica, thanks for your comment and question.

    Both the pipeline and marine transportation industries are regulated in Canada, which means there are legal requirements that companies operating in these industries must meet. Here are some links to appropriate Acts and regulations that outline the minimum requirements for Enbridge as the marine terminal operator and for the tanker owners/operators which will be other companies that specialize in this activity.

    Canada Shipping Act: http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/acts-regulations/acts-2001c26.htm
    Marine Liability Act: http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/acts-regulations/acts-2001c6.htm & http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/M-0.7/
    Marine Liability Regulations: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2002-307/

    Here's an overview of roles and responsibilities for tanker safety in Canada by Transport Canada: http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/mediaroom/backgrounders-b03-m003-1766.htm

    The overview references a TERMPOL review process, which Northern Gateway undertook voluntarily and Transport Canada found "no regulatory concerns or serious safety issues."

    And finally, here's a fact sheet on pipeline regulations in Canada: http://www.northerngateway.ca/assets/pdf/General%20Project%20-%20Regulatory/NGP-FS-01-007_Pipeline%20Regulations%20Canada.pdf

    We hope this helps your research, please let us know if we can help point you to additional information or try to answer some more questions. Good luck with your project!

  • Erica, Feb 14th, 2013 (2 years ago)

    Hello,

    I've seen in a few places, including this page, that you have agreed to accept liability if a spill is the fault of the terminal owner/operator. You have also mentioned that you are committed to ensuring the safety of the communities and marine environment along the shipping routes. I think that this is great, and I am happy to see how enthusiastic and committed you are in your responsibility in this project. I was just wondering if you have signed any contracts/agreements ensuring that you will hold to that responsibility, or if such an agreement is necessary. I am involved in a mock dispute at my school and I am arguing in favour of the project. I think that if there is such an agreement or proof of one, it would really strengthen the position. Thank you for you time.

    Erica

  • Northern Gateway, Dec 10th, 2012 (2 years ago)

    Hi John, thanks for your comment.

    Thank you for pointing out the grammar error on our PDF. We'll get that fixed.

    It's important to understand that numbers like the 36,000m3 and return period of 1 in 250 years are used to inform risk-based design mitigation measures--which is why we've committed to implementing the comprehensive safety measures listed above on this page.

    The weather station descriptions are available here: http://www.northerngateway.ca/assets/pdf/tdr/Risk%20Technical%20Data%20Reports/Wind%20Observations/Appendix%20A_Station%20Descriptions/Appendix%20A_Station%20Descriptions_2010.pdf

    Here's the description for the Emelia Rock station: "The station is located on a small rock island located between Emilia Island and Point Ashton in the area Gilttoyees Inlet joins with Douglas Channel. The station has a very good wind exposure for all directions with no obstacles within 500 meters of the station."

  • John How Terrace B.C., Dec 08th, 2012 (2 years ago)

    ASSERTIONS SUCH AS "CLOSED LOADING VIRTUALLY SUBSTANTIALLY REDUCES THE RISK OF OVERFILLING OF A TANKER"(SIC!) [YOUR QUANTITATIVE RISK ANALYSIS "FACT" SHEET] INDICATE A LACK OF ATTENTION TO DETAIL ON THE PART OF ENBRIDGE THAT BORDERS ON THE CAVALIER.

    "FOR TANKER TRANSIT, THE MAXIMUM CREDIBLE (SIC) SPILL SIZE IS ESTIMATED TO BE APPROXIMATELY 36,000 M3", BUT SEARCH THOUGH I DID, I COULD FIND NO INDICATION OF PROPOSED MAX TANKER CAPACITY; PRESUMABLY, A SHIP HOLDING MORE THAN 36,000 M3 WOULD DISCRETELY TERMINATE SPILLAGE AT THE PROMISED LIMIT?

    "RETURN TIME FOR A SPILL OF ANY SIZE FROM TANKER TRANSIT IS 250 YEARS". LET'S HAVE A TEENSY ONE RIGHT AWAY AND WE SHOULD BE GOOD FOR A QUARTER MILLENIUM.

    HAS ANYONE REALLY CHECKED OUT THE SITING OF THE GATEWAY WIND RECORDERS? I MEAN, R E A L L Y ? THEIR EXPOSURE TO PEAK WINDS IS TERRIBLE!

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